Milburn House

Milburn House was built in 1903. The Newcastle Chronicle recorded its size as 300ft on The Side, 160ft on Dean Street and 200ft in St Nicholas churchyard. And it is tall 6 storeys plus a basement or at least a ground floor on the corner of Dean St and The Side which turns into a basement higher up the hill. Its footprint is vast as well roughly triangular with major facades on three widely separated streets.

There are different entrances on different levels, each level in the building is indicated with a different letter, designed like an ocean-going liner, with floors labelled deck-style with A at the top and G on the ground floor.

The internal public spaces in Milburn House are beautiful, they include mosaics, painted picture panels and stained glass. It is a fairy-tale interior tiled in ochre yellow and deep green in a grand sweep of Art Nouveau.

Designed to resemble the bow of a ship pointing towards the River Tyne, communal areas are identified with deck letters rather than numbers and the spacious atria and halls surprise the visitor at each turn.

After exploring this area face the Cathedral and take the steep hill (known as the Side) down past Agora bar. Notice the bust above the door of Milburn House. This is Admiral Lord Collingwood who was born in 1748 in a house above this site. During the Battle of Trafalgar, it was Collingwood who took over command of the fleet after Lord Nelson was killed.

Milburn House is not open to the public, still some parts of it are visible and accessible to casual passers by on Dean Street.deanstreeet6

On Dean Street if you poke your head through the front door two paintings/sculpures meet your eye in the doorway-hallway.
The first “King Charles 1st entry to Newcastle”.

deanstreet9

The second
“Earl Percy setting out for Otterburn”.

deanstreet4

Milburn House was built to be like a ship or a liner ready to launch into the Tyne. Each floor is named with a letter rather than having a number. With floor A at the bottom and floor F at the top, or is it the other way around. Read More – PDF

Alderman Fenwick’s House

Some interesting facts about Alderman Fenwicks House. One of Newcastle’s finest buildings, originally built around 1660. The building closed in 1963 and proposals made to demolish it. Used as a business centre since 1997, the building was restored by the Tyne and Wear Buildings Preservation Trust. Open to the public on heritage open days. The building has Newcastle’s most beautiful cupola.

Alderman Fenwicks Cupola
Alderman Fenwicks Cupola

Ouseburn School

Burma or Byker? The former Ouseburn school, makes an arresting sight, on the outskirts of Newcastle, with its oriental style turrets. Rather like the Turnbull Building, it has an imposing presence. The architect F.W Rich designed the Turnbull building as well as Bolbec Hall. Hard to believe that all this large imposing building was once a school.

The School opened 1893 to accommodate 928 scholars; 352 infants on the ground floor, 576 older children on the first floor, with the top floor used for cookery, workshops, laundry, art. There were two play yards, one for infants and girls, the other for boys. The schools was aimed more at technical subjects rather than simply ‘book learning’.

Ventilator tubes led from every room to “up cast shafts” in the towers. Radiators admitted fresh warm air via piping from steam boilers, all class rooms had fireplaces – cookery room had an inbuilt oven range. The school cost £17,035, a lot of money at the time.

Ouseburn School now i4 Quayside
Ouseburn School now i4 Quayside

The building features Dutch type gables, decorative moulded brickwork and pagoda style turrets similar to those found on Burmese temples. The schools opened in 1893, closed in 1960s and the building re-opened in 1993 as a Business Development Centre, now called an Enterprise Centre.

The green field on one site of the school is known locally as ‘Grannys’ Park, it has a footpath made from gravestones, from the Ballast Hills burial ground.

The School opened 1893 to accommodate 928 scholars; 352 infants on the ground floor, 576 older children on the first floor, with the top floor used for cookery, workshops, laundry, art. There were two play yards, one for infants and girls, the other for boys. The schools was aimed more at technical subjects rather than simply ‘book learning’.

Ventilator tubes led from every room to “up cast shafts” in the towers. Radiators admitted fresh warm air via piping from steam boilers, all class rooms had fireplaces – cookery room had an inbuilt oven range. The school cost £17,035, a lot of money at the time.

The building features Dutch type gables, decorative moulded brickwork and pagoda style turrets similar to those found on Burmese temples. The schools opened in 1893, closed in 1960s and the building re-opened in 1993 as a Business Development Centre, now called “I4 Newcastle Enterprise Centre”.

The green field on one side of the school is known locally as ‘Grannys’ Park, it has a footpath made from gravestones, from the Ballast Hills burial ground.

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i4 Quayside

i4 Quaysidehttp://www.newcastleenterprisecentres.co.uk/centres/i4-quaysidei4 – Quayside offers high quality office and workshop accommodation. It has a serviced central reception along with two meeting rooms and a large private car park for…

Central Square North and South

Central Square North and South are two beautifully renovated buildings between Forth Street and Orchard Street, behind Newcastle’s Central Station.  These Grade A office buildings were trailblazers for the regeneration of this little known area.  Work was completed in 2000.

Central Square South
Central Square South

To get the most out of the buildings walk between the two for views of the interior, and a great view of the Town Wall on Orchard Street.  At one time there was a 7 metre sculpture, Vulcan, now sadly gone.  The sculpture, someone joked, was worth more than the buildings that flanked it.  This seems unlikely, the Sculptor, a Scot born in Leith, is very famous, so who knows?  The Sculpture now resides safely in the Scottish National Gallery in Edinburgh, it’s well worth the 90 minute train ride from Newcastle just to see it.

Central Square North
Central Square North

Both Central Square North and Central Square South, are  blessed with beautiful Atriums,  Art and Stairways.  Central Square North was once a Royal Mail sorting office.

Central Square North
Central Square North
Central Square South Lobby
Central Square South
Central Square South

Head for a narrow space between them to see one of the most beautiful atriums in all of Newcastle, also within, the Quadratica Cafe serving Costa Coffee.  Down the end of the lane is South Street and opposite is a brick building which once housed the worlds first locomotive factory (established by Robert Stephenson son of George). At the bottom of South Street go through the tunnel and turning left, will bring you back to the start of your walk.”

Central Square 2 Art

Forth Street, Newcastle Upon Tyne

Providing fresh vitality to a forgotten part of Newcastle behind Central Station, this office conversion was based on the old Royal Mail sorting office,

Central Square South
Central Square South
Central Square South Stairs
Central Square South Stairs

Central Square Two

2 Collingwood Street

2 Collingwood Street
2 Collingwood Street

Not many people walking past will even notice this ornate doorway, look closer and the caption “Northern Assurance Company” becomes visible. Collingwood Street was once Newcastle’s Wall Street, festooned with banks and insurance companies.

Northern Assurance Company Ltd
Northern Assurance Company Ltd

Northern Assurance contributed $2.5 Million dollars after the San Francisco earthquake in 1906, the largest insurance payout ever made at the time. Shortly thereafter the company became a limited liability company. Today the doorway is cracked and looking like its suffered itself from an earthquake.

Newcastle has many extraordinary doorways, not just this one.

Newcastle's extraordinary doors
Newcastle’s extraordinary doors