Blackfriars Building

Blackfriars is a real step back in time. The first thing you’ll notice is the noise. There is none. This little haven is one of Newcastle’s hidden gems and, befitting the quite air, was once home to Dominican friars who arrived here in 1239. The church that was once here was destroyed during Henry VIII’s dissolution of the Monasteries, but its outline is still visible today.

The building the Friars used as their eating area is now an award winning bistro/restaurant. Blackfriars, which also has tables outside on the greenery, so you can grab a bite to eat in the tranquil air of this delightful square. Alternatively bring your own sandwiches for a picnic.

Blackfriars

Blackfriars was one of the largest friaries in the country. It is now the only remaining medieval friary in the City and one of Newcastle’s oldest surviving buildings, the friars of the Dominican Order, who lived here from the 13th century until 1539. As Dominican Friars wore black cloaks over their white tunics, they were nicknamed Blackfriars.

The Blackfriars came to England in 1221 and eventually settled on this site in Newcastle in 1239. This friary, the second on the site after the first was destroyed by fire in 1248, was built around 1250.

After Henry V111’s Dissolution f the Greater Monasteries in 1539, the church was demolished and the other (still remaining) buildings were used as meeting rooms by nine craft guilds of the town. These included the Skinners and Glovers, Cordwainers (shoe smiths), Butchers, Tanners, Blacksmiths, Fullers and Dyers, Bakers and Brewers, who practised their crafts nearby. The guilds continued to use the upper floors of the buildings until the 19th century.

Blackfriars

The ground floor was used as almshouses for the poor and people lived here until 1951. By then the buildings were severely run down and threatened with demolition in the 1960s, but was saved and restored between 1973 and 1981.

When the Pope kept denying Henry V111 the right to divorce Catherine of Aragon so that he could marry Anne Boleyn, Henry began a program of religious changes to break England away from the power of the Roman Catholic Church. In 1534 he declared himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England and two years later started the closing of Roman Catholic religious houses in England and Wales, transferring their land and wealth to the Crown.

The Prior of Blackfriars in Newcastle, who was loyal to the Pope, spoke out against the Kings actions and was forced to flee to Scotland in 1536. In 1539 Blackfriars surrendered to the Crown. Each friar was given a small payment to help him survive until he found a new occupation.

In the 1960s Blackfriars was threatened with demolition. However the building was saved, largely through the efforts of Alderman Peter Renwick, Mayor of Newcastle in 1963 and 1964, and Sheriff in 1967.

It was recommended that premises for small businesses and craft workshops be created. During the restoration, archaeological excavations were carried out and the ruins of the church were revealed.

In 1980 as part of the celebrations of the 900th anniversary of the founding of Newcastle, H.M Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, visited Blackfriars and unveiled a commemorative plaque. The restoration was completed in 1981.

Blackfriars today continues the artistic craft of the guilds, some of the cloister buildings now house a number of craft workshops, while the former refectory became a restaurant. Beside the restaurant a covered archway leads to the courtyard of the friary.

In the past the courtyard probably contained a small garden and was surrounded by a cloister (covered walk), the cloister building and the church. Today, all that is left of the church are the foundations that show its outline in the grass. The courtyard itself is now a quite public green space with grass and trees.

Blackfriars – Dominicans in Newcastle

Saturday June 18th 2016, the Lord Mayor of Newcastle came to St Dominic’s. A celebration of  eight hundred years of history at the Jubilee Flower Festival. Eight hundred years since the Dominicans were founded, and eight hundred years of Mayors in Newcastle.

A Newcastle church celebrated 800 years of Dominican history with a magnificent feast of flowers. St Dominic’s Priory Church, on New Bridge Street was decked out with impressive floral displays to mark the 800th anniversary of the founding of the Dominican Order. The Jubilee Flower Festival was officially opened by the Lord Mayor of Newcastle on Saturday June 18th, in the year that Newcastle also celebrated 800 years of the mayoralty. Councillor Hazel Stephenson, newly installed as Lord Mayor, used the ceremonial Mayoral Sword to cut a special cake commissioned to celebrate the Dominican anniversary.

In the buildup to the festival as flower arrangers from all over the North East visited St Dominic’s, at Red Barns. There was an overwhelming level of support for this event with many people have offering their time, talents and encouragement. Teams of volunteers put aside hours of their time to clean and polish the church. This has brought young and old together to ensure all corners of the church are seen in their ancient splendour adorned by the beautiful flower arrangements on window-sills, church pillars and other designated areas.

Cathedral Church of St Nicholas

The elegant Lantern Tower (1448) is particularly ornate and the Cathedral’s crowning glory. Inside there are a host of interesting features (guidebooks are available). On leaving the cathedral turn left and left again (past the old the old church yard) and you’ll arrive at a paved area.

Rebuilt in 1359, it remained the tallest building in Newcastle for over 300 years. It’s now the sixth tallest structure in the city and the second tallest religious building. The Lantern Tower was nearly destroyed by Scottish invaders in 1644. The Tower survived largely because Scottish prisoners were placed as hostages inside.

Every year on Trafalgar Day a simple ceremony is held here to honour Admiral Lord Collingwood, now buried alongside Nelson in St. Paul’s, London.

Cathedral Church of St Nicholas
Cathedral Church of St Nicholas

The Cathedral Church of St Nicholas is a Grade 1 Listed Building and one of the most beautiful and historic buildings in Newcastle. The spire has dominated Newcastle’s skyline and served as a prominent landmark and navigation point for ships in the River Tyne for over 500 years.

The Cathedral is filled with beautiful stained glass. A beautiful roundel depicting the Madonna feeding the Christ Child is the only surviving medieval stained glass. More modern stained glass works such as in St George’s Chapel were erected in honour of two of Tyneside’s late 19th / early 20th century industrial pioneers who both died in 1931 within weeks of each other.A stained glass window in St George’s Chapel celebrates Charles Parsons, with an angel above St Christopher shown carrying Turbinia.

Turbinia was the first turbine driven steam yacht with which Parsons astonished the Queen’s Navy at the Spithead naval review in 1897.  There is also a stained Glass tribute to Charles Parson in Westminster Abbey.  On the north wall of St Cuthbert’s Chapel is a representation of the Mauretania with the Blue Riband, an award held for 22 years as the fastest liner crossing the Atlantic.

St Nicholas’ Cathedral is a lot older than most people think, its unusual lantern spire was constructed in 1448, for hundreds of years it was the main navigation point for ships using the Tyne.

The Cathedral hosts one of the finest Flemish brasses in the United Kingdom. Originally covering the tomb of Roger Thornton, three times mayor of Newcastle, several times Member of Parliament, successful merchant and great benefactor to the Cathedral, the Thornton Brass (pre 1429) is believed to be the largest brass in the United Kingdom. This commemoration to Roger Thornton, his wife, seven sons and seven daughters an be seen behind the High Altar.

The Chancel furnishings were designed by Ralph Hedley (1848-1913), a woodcarver, painter and illustrator, best known for his paintings of everyday life in the North of England.

Just to the north of the Cathedral stands a bronze statue of Queen Victoria erected to commemorate 500 years of the Shrievalty (the jurisdiction of a sheriff) of Newcastle. Sculpted by Alfred Gilbert and unveiled in 1903, two years after Queen Victoria’s death, the statue was a gift from W H Stephenson, a company director and politician who held the office of Mayor of Newcastle seven times.

St Ann’s Battlefield

Location: City Road, NE1 2AF
Location: City Road, NE1 2AF

St Ann’s is accessible from the quiet Breamish Street, the much busier City Road and the 99 stairs from the Quayside.

St. Ann’s is a Grade 1 listed church consecrated in 1768. There has been a church on this site since medieval times. The present church was largely built with stone from the City Walls. The churchyard is among the last within the city to be closed for burials and is the resting place of many who died in the last great cholera epidemic.

St Ann’s Church served as a Quayside church. Its various savings clubs, societies, guilds and festivals supported local Battlefield families through good times and bad. Today, St Ann’s gives its name to the whole Battlefield area, now a quiet council estate built in the 1960s to replace the older terraces.

The Battlefield, like its neighbour Shieldfield, has experienced major changes in the last 50 years as riverside industries have closed and the Quayside has been regenerated as an office and leisure locality.

Nevertheless, there is still a strong sense of community and distinctiveness, as present and former residents continue to support the area through the Tenants Association on Breamish Street and the Friends of St Ann’s Church.

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The residential area adjoining the west of the lower Ouseburn now known as St Ann’s was originally known as the Battlefield. The origins of the name are unclear, as there is no record of any battle having taken place in the area.

The name might be a corruption of Bottle Field, which appears on a map in the 1870s and possibly reflects the practice of in-filling clay pits with local industrial waste. The glass bottle industry was concentrated immediately east of the Ouseburn for almost 300 years from the 1640s.

St Ann’s Church is today the major landmark of the Battlefield, standing proud above the east Quayside. Originally established as a chapel of All Saints, the church became increasingly important to the area as the eastward expansion of the Quayside brought an influx of largely unskilled and semi-skilled workers to the area.

Until the 1880s much of the Battlefield was open ground, but thereafter the area was covered with terraces of flats and houses laid out in streets named after Northumbrian rivers – Pont Street, Breamish Street, Coquet Street, Wansbeck Street, Rede Street, and Blyth Street. These flats tended to be roomier and better built than similar properties in the lower Ouseburn, and Battlefield residents had a strong sense of local identity that focused more on the Tyne riverfront than the Ouseburn or Shieldfield.

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Location St Ann’s from the Quayside

 

All Saints

All Saints

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All Saints Church was built in the years from 1786 to 1796 by the architect David Stephenson. Sir John Betjeman, the former Poet Laureate, described it as one of the finest Georgian churches in the country. It has a magnificent elliptical auditorium and splendid classical pillars. A church has stood on this site since the twelfth century, the medieval All Hallows’ Church giving way to the present church. The building was used as a place of worship until 1959.

Closed as a Church 1961 and has since undergone major restoration. Most of the time the building is shut, which is a great shame, seeing the inside is a rare treat. The old church building, now gone, was said to have been built on the site of a Roman Pantheon, and so may have older religious associations than any church in the city.

The view of All Saints towering over King Street is particularly dramatic. A view which has taken more than one visitor by surprise, including the architectural historian Ian Nairn. Take a look at Turner’s picture of Newcastle in 1823. Apart from the River Tyne, the only recognisable landmarks are All Saints and the Church of St Nicholas.

All Saints Church was built in the years from 1786 to 1796 by the architect David Stephenson. Sir John Betjeman, the former Poet Laureate, described it as one of the finest
Georgian churches in the country. It has a magnificent elliptical auditorium and splendid classical pillars. A church has stood on this site since the twelfth century, the medieval All Hallows’ Church giving way to the present church. The building was used as a place of worship until 1959.

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Closed as a Church 1961 and has since undergone major restoration. Most of the time the building is shut, which is a great shame, seeing the inside is a rare treat. The old church building, now gone, was said to have been built on the site of a Roman Pantheon, and so may have older religious associations than any church in the city.

 

Wikipedia

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All Saints View from from King Street, Newcastle Quayside

CastleGate Building

The Manors Power Station was built between 1901 and 1904 to generate electricity for the Newcastle Electric Trams system and the new electrically driven cranes on Newcastle’s Quayside.  Electricity generation for the trolly-bus system stopped in 1966, after which the building was used as a maintenance centre. Later it was used as an indoor car park. During the construction of the Metro system in the 70’s a full size mockup station was constructed in the Turbine Hall for training purposes.

The best time to see this building is in September when it normally is accessible for the Heritage Open Day Weekend. Guided Tours are provided on this weekend and are quite enthralling.

Stagecoach owned the building until 1996, after which it was bought by City Church. The building was renamed CastleGate and the Turbine Hall is used as a Conference Centre. The Turbine Hall still houses a giant 50 ton crane, once used to lift new turbines into place.

Home - CastleGate

Home – CastleGatehttp://thecastlegate.co.uk/A historic conference and events venue in the heart of Newcastle

FIRST TRAMS GOSFORTH PARK , NEWCASTLE - YouTube

FIRST TRAMS GOSFORTH PARK , NEWCASTLE – YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cRi_DQWTgEBUY DVD NOW PMP FILMS http://www.pmpfilms.com the world’s largest collection of transport hobby films, see website for shop, lists, links, blog etc

St Mary’s R.C. Cathedral

Clayton St W, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 5HH
St Marys Cathedral Clayton St W, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 5HH

The Cathedral is situated in the heart of Newcastle’s Grainger Town, opposite Newcastle Central Station. There is a garden facing the station dedicated to Basil Hume, former Archbishop of Westminster. Basil Hume was born in Newcastle. The Cathedral is normally open and it has some stunning stained glass. There is a cafe.

St Mary’s Architect was Augustus Pugin, sometimes known as God’s Architect, he was responsible for the interior redesign of the Palace of Westminster after a fire in 1832.

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Statue of Basil Hume, in the Basil Hume Garden.

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St Mary's Cathedral

St Mary’s Cathedralhttp://www.stmaryscathedral.org.uk/Holy Mass Monday to Friday 8.00 am and 12.05 pm Saturday and Public Holidays 10.00 am Sunday 8.00 am (spoken), 10.00 am (cantor), 11.30 am (choir), 6.30 pm (music group)
Cathedral of St Mary on Vimeo

Cathedral of St Mary on Vimeohttp://vimeo.com/92137013
St Mary's Cathedral, Newcastle upon Tyne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Extraordinary Churches in Newcastle

Sailors Bethel Quayside
Sailors Bethel Quayside

There are a lot of beautiful churches in Newcastle, but only seven churches are Grade 1 Listed. Listed here are the Grade 1 Listed Churches all of which are remarkable for one reason or another, all are within easy walking distance of the centre, perhaps with the exception of one in Jesmond.

How to Find Six Grade 1 Listed Churches in Newcastle - Snapguide

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