Leazes Park

Leazes Park is the first public park on Tyneside, officially opened by Alderman Sir John Hammond on 23rd December 1873.

Various designers John Hancock, John Laing and finally John Fulton the Town Surveyor produced designs for a new park, some of which were rejected as being too expensive or extravagant. The final layout centres around the lake which was created on the line of the Lort Burn. The Bandstand and Terrace were added and later the area was surrounded by metal railings.

The grand Jubilee gates were added to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897. In 1905, a bust of Alderman Sir Charles Hammond was erected as the centrepiece to the Terrace and the park was complete.

In 1996 the first round of Heritage Lottery Bid proposals were started and on the 19th April 2001 the Heritage Lottery Fund approved the Leazes Park Restoration Project and provided a grant of 3.7 million to restore the park.

The Terrace, Bandstand Area were ornamented in the grand Victorian tradition. The bandstand was built in 1875 by George Smith and Hay of Glasgow. It disappeared in the 1960s but was recreated from historic records as part of the park restoration by Heritage Engineering. The rebuilt bandstand was constructed at ground level to allow access for wheelchair users.

The Terrace is a grand feature ornamented with vases, urns and statues. Visitors could promenade, enjoy the views and listen to music from the bandstands. Laid out in 1879, the terrace was mass produced using concrete which could be moulded into the shapes needed. It was a challenge to match the appearance of the original concrete. Brick rubble, glass, coal and even bones in the concrete were replicated using coloured gravels.

The centre of the terrace was chosen in 1902 as the best location for the bust of Alderman Sir Charles Hamond who supported the campaign for Leazes Park. The bust was recreated in 2004 after being lost in 1992.

Behind the terrace as you leave the Park you will pass through the Jubilee Gates. Constructed in 1879 to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria. Constructed from wrought iron, they fell into disrepair but were completely rebuilt in 2004. The pedestrian gate on the right is an original gate which was saved and refurbished.

Underneath the Park flows the Lort Burn commemorated in this work of art.

Leazes Park

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Palace of Arts – Exhibition Park

Palace of Arts Exhibition Park

The building was originally named the Palace of Arts, and was first used to house art work from across the world at the 1929 North East Coast Exhibition. The North East Coast Exhibition was planned as a tribute to the region’s skills and industry. the intention of the exhibition was to show the world wha the north east was capable of producing. It was also aimed at being an antidote to the recession of the 1920s but by the time the Exhibition closed the North East was affected by the full blown effects of the depression.

The Lord Mayor of Newcastle Upon Tyne, Sir Arthur Lambert, was elected Chairman of the North East Coast Exhibition Committee in 1927. Sir Arthur Lambert and other organizers wanted to showcase the success of north east engineering to established clients and to find new ones. The ethos of the exhibition was to endeavor to bring new industries to provide work for the large numbers of unemployed in the region. The exhibition ran for six months and gave endless pleasure to almost 5 million people before closing with a huge fireworks display.

The Palace of Arts was designed by W. & T. R. Milburn Architects of Sunderland. The building is made from reinforced concrete and is one of the earliest examples of this. Because the building was designed to house important works of art from across the world, it was structurally stronger than the majority of other temporary exhibition buildings. Work was carried out in 2014 to stabilise the Palace of Arts structurally.

The majority of the temporary buildings were also designed by W. & T. R. Milburn and were formed from compressed asbestos. the Marketing Board Pavillion was the only building to be designed by different architects. This was due to it being sponsored by the government and being designed in-house by a government architect.

The Palace of Arts is a Grade II listed building, and the only remaining building built fro the 1929 North East Coast Exhibition. A ‘listed building’ is a building, object or structure that has been judged to be of national importance in terms of architectural or historical interest. The building or structure is added to a special register, called the List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historical Interest.

The Palace of Arts was an integral part of the Tyneside Summer Exhibitions from the 1960s until 1987. From the 1980s to 2006 the building was home to the Military vehicle Museum which closed due to the buildings deteriorating condition.

TSMEE
The Tyneside Society of Model and Experimental Engineers is a well established group who celebrated their 70th anniversary in 2014. Permission was granted in 1948 for the erection of a passenger carrying railway in Exhibition Park. It was opened by Lord the Mayor on 12th May 1951 and the completed railway was some 00 feet in length. 50 feet was removed in 1960 to accommodate the “Turbinia” extension to the Science Museum. The track was re-laid with a reduced length of 647 feet in 1962. Since its opening, the railway has given enjoyment to countless generations of members, local residents and visitors to Exhibition Park

Bobby Robson Garden

The Bobby Robson Garden contains five marble slabs engraved with biographical details of many of the clubs and players that Sir Bobby worked with in a long illustrious career as player and manager.

Bobby Robson Garden
Bobby Robson Garden

The Flowering of the Lort Burn – Tom Grimsey 2005

The work is a direct response to the Lort Burn that flows beneath Leazes Park and through the lake. The work consists of a stream made from blue terazzo and planting. Stainless steel flowers are set into the paths where to mark where the burn flows. A playful splash-pool, situated at the top of the park suggests the source of the Lort Burn.

The Flowering of the Lort Burn - Tom Grimsey 2005
The Flowering of the Lort Burn – Tom Grimsey 2005

Welcome to Jesmond Dene

William Armstrong and his wife, Margaret, made their home just up the road from here in 1835. They were given land in the Dene as a wedding gift and extended the grounds as their fortunes grew.

Over the next 30 years William Armstrong became one of the most important engineers in the world. He built his wealth on developing hydraulic cranes, bridges, field artillery and guns for battleships. He test his earliest guns by firing across the valley from a field near here.

The Armstrong’s transformed the Dene by planting hundreds of trees and shrubs, creating waterfalls, a grotto and miles of footpaths. It is now a public path for everyone to enjoy.

Today you can see a variety of flora and fauna such as rhododendrons, woodland birds and flowers. If you are lucky you may catch a glimpse of at the striking kingfisher.

Ouseburn Parks Visitors Centre

Welcome to Ouseburn Parks Visitor Centre, gift shop, Millfield House Cafe and Conference Centre

Ouseburn Parks is made up of five distinct green spaces; Jesmond Dene, Paddy Freeman’s Park, Armstrong Park, Heaton Park and Jesmond Vale where there is plenty to see and do.

Please take a look at the visitor centre for more information about events, volunteering, education opportunities, the history and wildlife of the parks

The Shoe Tree


In 1627, Sheriff Babington of Heaton threw his shoes up into the Sycamore to celebrate the birth of his Grandson. Since then residents of Heaton have continued this tradition by throwing their shoes up into the tree, whenever they celebrate a special occasion. The tree, as you can see is full of shoes, though not everyone believes the Sheriff Babington Story.

City Stadium Park

City Stadium Park

 

Location: City Stadium Park, Ouseburn Monument

The City Stadium Park is a pleasant green space, with the remnants of a cinder track going around it. For nearly fifty years this place was known as the Ouseburn Tip. A protracted attempt to create a landfill over the culverted Ouseburn River. Before 1907, this area was a steep-sided valley that divided the east end districts of Newcastle from the town centre.

The Ouseburn Tip could not support the housing originally planned by Newcastle Corporation, and in 1961, Councillor T. Dan Smith proposed that the area be used as a sports stadium, to be completed in time for the Empire Games of 1966. These plans never materialised.

Thirty five metres below the Ouseburn Monument, the Ouseburn River flows, in a the Ouseburn Culvert. Some of the places through which the Ouseburn flows are engraved at the base of the Monument. Woolsington, Callerton, Brunton, Gosforth, Jesmond Dene, Ouseburn Valley.

Shieldfield Green

Location: Shieldfield Green, NE2 1YB

The new University Footbridge, connecting city Campus East with the main part of the city, brings Shieldfield Green within easy walking distance of the city centre. Shieldfield Green feels like a quiet peaceful oasis compared to the bustle of Northumberland St.

Shieldfield was a vibrant and stable community throughout the industrial revolution and was formerly home to many of Newcastle’s prosperous families, before other city suburbs became more fashionable. Pleasant Row, now Falconer Street, was the 1810 birthplace of arms manufacturer and founder of Elswick, Lord Armstrong.

The area previously boasted a windmill, a colliery and the mansion house on Shieldfield Green – where King Charles I was permitted to play bowls and golf in the 1600s.

Armstrong's Birthplace - Shield Field, City Campus East
Armstrong’s Birthplace – Shield Field, City Campus East

 

Civic Centre Gardens


Location: St Thomas – Civic Centre

A pleasant stretch of green bounded by St Marys Place and the Haymarket. The Green contains flower beds and several interesting war memorials. There are various sculptures around the Civic Centre. See if you can spot the Grand Hotel, now student accomodation, high above Blackwells Bookstore, or the beautiful new university building Kings Gate.

The main war memorial is known as ‘Response’ but there are also memorials for the South African (Boer) Campaign and the War in Burma.

The Grade II* memorial to commemorate the raising of several battalions of the Northumberland Fusiliers in Newcastle, known as “The Response”, or the Renwick War Memorial, is a large pale granite monument with a group sculpture or frieze of bronze showing soldiers leaving for war.

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Town Moor


Location: Town Moor

Newcastle’s Town Moor is bigger than Hampstead Heath and Hyde Park joined together. There are a couple of small hills on the Town Moor, both of which offer superb views of the city, particularly at sunrise and sunset.

The Town Moor has around 1000 acres of open space providing a green heart to the City. It has a history as pasture land dating back to the 12th century, its land tenure and use is regulated by its own Act of Parliament. It must be one of the finest urban open spaces in the United Kingdom.

The open nature of Town Moor land supports many species not otherwise found in the normal urban City landscape. The Town Moor has a high skylark population more than 46 species of birds have been seen there in recent years.

There are plenty of cows grazing there at differing times of the year. Three small hill provide great views the city on clear days. Resident of Jesmond can commute to and from the city by walking across the moor.

One of the busiest days of the year for the Town Moor is probably the Great North Run, the largest half marathon in the world which starts nearby on the Central Motorway. There is also a much smaller marathon which takes place around the Moor each October, though numbers are strictly limited.

The Freemen of Newcastle upon Tyne

The Freemen of Newcastle upon Tynehttp://www.freemenofnewcastle.com/themoor.htmlThe Freemen have exercised their right to graze cows on the Moor from time immemorial, the right to do so having originated prior to the Norman Conquest. The Newcastle upon Tyne…
Sunrise timelapse newcastle - YouTube

Sunrise timelapse newcastle – YouTubehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3TCmeZRTecTimelapse footage of sunrise taken with a fujifilm HS10 in newcastle town moor. WATCH IN 1080P If you want to use this footage please PM me.

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Exhibition Park


Location: Exhibition Park, Claremont Road, NE2 4PZ

Originally the Bull Park. In 1886 the Mayor of Newcastle requested the use of the Bull Park to hold the Royal Jubilee Exhibition in 1887 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s 50th year on the throne. The Bull Park was where the City’s bull was penned for stud. The site was the wedge of land at the corner of Claremont Road and the Great North Road. Later this land was cleared to build the Hancock Museum. The organising committee realised that the Bull Park was to small for the Exhibition and further requested Town moor recreation ground. This is where the current park is now.

The Royal Jubilee Exhibition was duly held in 1887 and proved a tremendous success and attracted two million (2,000,000) visitors. The name Exhibition Park was first used during the Jubilee Exhibition of 1887 but the old name of Bull Park persisted for some time.
The only remaining item from the 1887 Exhibition is the bandstand and all other temporary buildings and structures were removed and the grounds reinstated.

Today the Park has Croquet lawns, Childrens Cycling Club, there are two tennis courts and one basketball court and a Skatepark has been developed at the main entrance. Each Saturday there is a Park Run, a 5km run – it’s you against the clock, Saturday, rain or shine, at 9:00am

Newcastle parkrun | Newcastle parkrun

Newcastle parkrun | Newcastle parkrunhttp://www.parkrun.org.uk/newcastle/Nothing – it’s free! but please register before your first run. Only ever register with parkrun once. Don’t forget to bring a printed copy of your barcode (request a reminder).…
Gosforth Road Club,Cycling Club, Road Cycling, Gosforth Cycling North East

Gosforth Road Club,Cycling Club, Road Cycling, Gosforth Cycling North Easthttp://www.gosforthroadclub.com/The current Club membership is 180. Ages range from 7to mid 70’s. Club members now actively participate in all branches of the sport including Road Racing, Mountain Biking, Time…

Leazes Park


Location: Leazes Park

Leazes Park is the first public park on Tyneside, officially opened by Alderman Sir John Hammond on 23rd December 1873.

Various designers John Hancock, John Laing and finally John Fulton the Town Surveyor produced designs for a new park, some of which were rejected as being too expensive or extravagant. The final layout centres around the lake which was created on the line of the Lort Burn. The Bandstand and Terrace were added and later the area was surrounded by metal railings.

The grand Jubilee gates were added to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897. In 1905, a bust of Alderman Sir Charles Hammond was erected as the centrepiece to the Terrace and the park was complete.

In 1996 the first round of Heritage Lottery Bid proposals were started and on the 19th April 2001 the Heritage Lottery Fund approved the Leazes Park Restoration Project and provided a grant of 3.7 million to restore the park.

The Terrace, Bandstand Area were ornamented in the grand Victorian tradition. The bandstand was built in 1875 by George Smith and Hay of Glasgow. It disappeared in the 1960s but was recreated from historic records as part of the park restoration by Heritage Engineering. The rebuilt bandstand was constructed at ground level to allow access for wheelchair users.

The Terrace is a grand feature ornamented with vases, urns and statues. Visitors could promenade, enjoy the views and listen to music from the bandstands. Laid out in 1879, the terrace was mass produced using concrete which could be moulded into the shapes needed. It was a challenge to match the appearance of the original concrete. Brick rubble, glass, coal and even bones in the concrete were replicated using coloured gravels.

The centre of the terrace was chosen in 1902 as the best location for the bust of Alderman Sir Charles Hamond who supported the campaign for Leazes Park. The bust was recreated in 2004 after being lost in 1992.

Behind the terrace as you leave the Park you will pass through the Jubilee Gates. Constructed in 1879 to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria. Constructed from wrought iron, they fell into disrepair but were completely rebuilt in 2004. The pedestrian gate on the right is an original gate which was saved and refurbished.

 

Leazes Park - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Leazes Park – Wikipedia, the free encyclopediahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leazes_ParkLeazes Park is a park in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. It is the city’s oldest park, opened in 1873, and lies to the west of the city centre. The park contains a lake above the…

 

Summerhill Park


Location: Summerhill Park

This gentile and partially hidden park and square are in marked contrast to the more boisterous Westgate Road. Walk up Westgate Rd, turn left after M & S Motorcycles, and the Park is revealed.  Fine houses (many of them listed) overlook a community park and the former bowling club, including the home of Robert Stephenson, which as a blue plaque, in Greenfield Place. Summerhill Square is a hidden gem in Newcastle upon Tyne – a peaceful late 18th and early 19th century inner city square within easy walking distance of Central Station, St. James’s Park and the busy central shopping areas of the city.

Each year there is a summer fair, details from the Friends of Summerhill website.

Summerhill Pavilion, tucked away in the heart of a peaceful Georgian inner city square, is a spacious and characterful building, which has just undergone essential renovation works, thanks to a capital grant from Newcastle City Council; a kitchen has recently been added and additional works to improve facilities further will be undertaken over the next two years. Summerhill Pavilion is a wonderful venue for events of all kinds, it is available for private hire for daytime and evening events.

Summerhill Bowling Club is located at the top (West) end of Summerhill Square. It includes two championship-size bowling greens alongside other substantial open spaces.

Summerhill Bowling Club was officially opened on 17 July 1916 as a private members bowling club in the Summerhill area of Newcastle upon Tyne. The leading figure in the establishment of the club was the director of a local iron and steel company, Henry Alfred Lawson, who went on to become the club’s first president and the Chairman of the Board of Directors. In 1922 Henry Lawson also became the first president of the newly formed Northumberland County Bowling Association. The Club was visited by some other famous sportsmen throughout its history. Between 1943 and 1957 many famous names from Newcastle United Football Club played bowls on the club’s greens, including Jackie Milburn, Len Shackleton and Roy Bentley.

The club had many successful years and was renowned for its welcoming atmosphere along with the quality of its greens. Due to falling membership the club closed in March 2011 and its assets were passed to the Friends of Summerhill to be adapted for community use.

The Friends of Summerhill | Home

The Friends of Summerhill | Homehttp://www.friendsofsummerhill.org.uk/Summerhill Square is a hidden gem in Newcastle upon Tyne – a tranquil oasis just minutes away from Central Station, St. James’s Park and the busy central shopping areas of the…

 

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