Gibson Street Baths and Wash House

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On the corner of New Bridge Street and Gibson Street, by the side of what is now the busy commuter route, the A193, heading east toward Byker.
Gibson Street Baths closed in 1965, and has not been used as swimming pool since then. Many of the orginal tiles and fixtures are still there but are inaccessible. The building is used occasionally as a badminton court.

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National Provincial Bank of England – Dean Street

On the corner, where Dean Street meets Mosley Street, be sure and look up! Once upon a time this was a proud looking bank building, like so many on Mosley Street, now it’s a place to eat and drink. The giant caption emblazoned on both Dean Street and Mosley Street, “The National Provincial Bank of England”, In 1970 the bank became part of NatWest.

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Milburn House

Milburn House was built in 1903. The Newcastle Chronicle recorded its size as 300ft on The Side, 160ft on Dean Street and 200ft in St Nicholas churchyard. And it is tall 6 storeys plus a basement or at least a ground floor on the corner of Dean St and The Side which turns into a basement higher up the hill. Its footprint is vast as well roughly triangular with major facades on three widely separated streets.

There are different entrances on different levels, each level in the building is indicated with a different letter, designed like an ocean-going liner, with floors labelled deck-style with A at the top and G on the ground floor.

The internal public spaces in Milburn House are beautiful, they include mosaics, painted picture panels and stained glass. It is a fairy-tale interior tiled in ochre yellow and deep green in a grand sweep of Art Nouveau.

Designed to resemble the bow of a ship pointing towards the River Tyne, communal areas are identified with deck letters rather than numbers and the spacious atria and halls surprise the visitor at each turn.

After exploring this area face the Cathedral and take the steep hill (known as the Side) down past Agora bar. Notice the bust above the door of Milburn House. This is Admiral Lord Collingwood who was born in 1748 in a house above this site. During the Battle of Trafalgar, it was Collingwood who took over command of the fleet after Lord Nelson was killed.

Milburn House is not open to the public, still some parts of it are visible and accessible to casual passers by on Dean Street.deanstreeet6

On Dean Street if you poke your head through the front door two paintings/sculpures meet your eye in the doorway-hallway.
The first “King Charles 1st entry to Newcastle”.

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The second
“Earl Percy setting out for Otterburn”.

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Milburn House was built to be like a ship or a liner ready to launch into the Tyne. Each floor is named with a letter rather than having a number. With floor A at the bottom and floor F at the top, or is it the other way around. Read More – PDF

Emerson Chambers

Wandering around Blackett Street, most people need focus their attention on avoiding being run over by a bus. If you do get time, its worthwhile studying this “Waterstone’s” building in a bit more detail. There is a very ornate clock at the top of the building, if you have good eyesight you might also notice four finely carved stone faces, which are more expressive than many found on buildings in Newcastle. Also worth noting, the magnificent doorway on the side of the building.

Finely Carved Faces, Emerson Chambers
Finely Carved Faces, Emerson Chambers
Doorway, Emerson Chambers
Doorway, Emerson Chambers
Emerson Chambers Clock
Emerson Chambers Clock

Dex Garage

DEX Garage opened in the centre of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1931 in the ‘Art Deco’ style of the period. It is the oldest existing straight ramped multi-storey car park outside of London and the fourth oldest existing in England.

It originally included rest and washing facilities for Chauffers awaiting the conclusion of their employers’ business or entertainment in the city centre; a car lift and turntables to transport these large Chauffer-driven cars to an available parking space; washing, servicing and refuelling facilities as well as a new car showroom.

The 5-storey steel frame and reinforced concrete structure remains in use today as a city centre car park, with many of its original features remaining intact. We were asked by Newcastle City Council to prepare a report on the building to assess it’s architectural significance.

 Dex Garage, New Bridge Street, Newcastle, NE1 8AB

Alderman Fenwick’s House

Some interesting facts about Alderman Fenwicks House. One of Newcastle’s finest buildings, originally built around 1660. The building closed in 1963 and proposals made to demolish it. Used as a business centre since 1997, the building was restored by the Tyne and Wear Buildings Preservation Trust. Open to the public on heritage open days. The building has Newcastle’s most beautiful cupola.

Alderman Fenwicks Cupola
Alderman Fenwicks Cupola

Student Accommodation in Newcastle

Newcastle is awash with new student accommodation, some is in beautiful old restored buildings, some in brand new buildings. It is student accommodation rather than offices which seems to be the big growth area in new buildings

Newcastle is full of surprising buildings, some of which are or once were student accommodation. Perhaps the rapid growth of student accommodation is a bubble, perhaps it reflects the growing power and influence of Universities in the economy. Whatever the reason new student accommodation is changing the face of many city centres, including Newcastle and Gateshead

Cathedral Church of St Nicholas

The elegant Lantern Tower (1448) is particularly ornate and the Cathedral’s crowning glory. Inside there are a host of interesting features (guidebooks are available). On leaving the cathedral turn left and left again (past the old the old church yard) and you’ll arrive at a paved area.

Rebuilt in 1359, it remained the tallest building in Newcastle for over 300 years. It’s now the sixth tallest structure in the city and the second tallest religious building. The Lantern Tower was nearly destroyed by Scottish invaders in 1644. The Tower survived largely because Scottish prisoners were placed as hostages inside.

Every year on Trafalgar Day a simple ceremony is held here to honour Admiral Lord Collingwood, now buried alongside Nelson in St. Paul’s, London.

Cathedral Church of St Nicholas
Cathedral Church of St Nicholas

The Cathedral Church of St Nicholas is a Grade 1 Listed Building and one of the most beautiful and historic buildings in Newcastle. The spire has dominated Newcastle’s skyline and served as a prominent landmark and navigation point for ships in the River Tyne for over 500 years.

The Cathedral is filled with beautiful stained glass. A beautiful roundel depicting the Madonna feeding the Christ Child is the only surviving medieval stained glass. More modern stained glass works such as in St George’s Chapel were erected in honour of two of Tyneside’s late 19th / early 20th century industrial pioneers who both died in 1931 within weeks of each other.A stained glass window in St George’s Chapel celebrates Charles Parsons, with an angel above St Christopher shown carrying Turbinia.

Turbinia was the first turbine driven steam yacht with which Parsons astonished the Queen’s Navy at the Spithead naval review in 1897.  There is also a stained Glass tribute to Charles Parson in Westminster Abbey.  On the north wall of St Cuthbert’s Chapel is a representation of the Mauretania with the Blue Riband, an award held for 22 years as the fastest liner crossing the Atlantic.

St Nicholas’ Cathedral is a lot older than most people think, its unusual lantern spire was constructed in 1448, for hundreds of years it was the main navigation point for ships using the Tyne.

The Cathedral hosts one of the finest Flemish brasses in the United Kingdom. Originally covering the tomb of Roger Thornton, three times mayor of Newcastle, several times Member of Parliament, successful merchant and great benefactor to the Cathedral, the Thornton Brass (pre 1429) is believed to be the largest brass in the United Kingdom. This commemoration to Roger Thornton, his wife, seven sons and seven daughters an be seen behind the High Altar.

The Chancel furnishings were designed by Ralph Hedley (1848-1913), a woodcarver, painter and illustrator, best known for his paintings of everyday life in the North of England.

Just to the north of the Cathedral stands a bronze statue of Queen Victoria erected to commemorate 500 years of the Shrievalty (the jurisdiction of a sheriff) of Newcastle. Sculpted by Alfred Gilbert and unveiled in 1903, two years after Queen Victoria’s death, the statue was a gift from W H Stephenson, a company director and politician who held the office of Mayor of Newcastle seven times.

Ouseburn School

Burma or Byker? The former Ouseburn school, makes an arresting sight, on the outskirts of Newcastle, with its oriental style turrets. Rather like the Turnbull Building, it has an imposing presence. The architect F.W Rich designed the Turnbull building as well as Bolbec Hall. Hard to believe that all this large imposing building was once a school.

The School opened 1893 to accommodate 928 scholars; 352 infants on the ground floor, 576 older children on the first floor, with the top floor used for cookery, workshops, laundry, art. There were two play yards, one for infants and girls, the other for boys. The schools was aimed more at technical subjects rather than simply ‘book learning’.

Ventilator tubes led from every room to “up cast shafts” in the towers. Radiators admitted fresh warm air via piping from steam boilers, all class rooms had fireplaces – cookery room had an inbuilt oven range. The school cost £17,035, a lot of money at the time.

Ouseburn School now i4 Quayside
Ouseburn School now i4 Quayside

The building features Dutch type gables, decorative moulded brickwork and pagoda style turrets similar to those found on Burmese temples. The schools opened in 1893, closed in 1960s and the building re-opened in 1993 as a Business Development Centre, now called an Enterprise Centre.

The green field on one site of the school is known locally as ‘Grannys’ Park, it has a footpath made from gravestones, from the Ballast Hills burial ground.

The School opened 1893 to accommodate 928 scholars; 352 infants on the ground floor, 576 older children on the first floor, with the top floor used for cookery, workshops, laundry, art. There were two play yards, one for infants and girls, the other for boys. The schools was aimed more at technical subjects rather than simply ‘book learning’.

Ventilator tubes led from every room to “up cast shafts” in the towers. Radiators admitted fresh warm air via piping from steam boilers, all class rooms had fireplaces – cookery room had an inbuilt oven range. The school cost £17,035, a lot of money at the time.

The building features Dutch type gables, decorative moulded brickwork and pagoda style turrets similar to those found on Burmese temples. The schools opened in 1893, closed in 1960s and the building re-opened in 1993 as a Business Development Centre, now called “I4 Newcastle Enterprise Centre”.

The green field on one side of the school is known locally as ‘Grannys’ Park, it has a footpath made from gravestones, from the Ballast Hills burial ground.

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i4 Quayside

i4 Quaysidehttp://www.newcastleenterprisecentres.co.uk/centres/i4-quaysidei4 – Quayside offers high quality office and workshop accommodation. It has a serviced central reception along with two meeting rooms and a large private car park for…

Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art

Back in the 1950s, Baltic was a flour mills used to store grain, with the River Tyne being used as a key route for trading with Scandinavian and Baltic states. The company that built it had a habit of naming its warehouses after famous oceans of the world, hence its name. The Baltic Flour Mill was built by the Rank Hovis company to a late-1930s design by architects Gelder and Kitchen and completed in 1950. It was extended in 1957 by the addition of an animal feed mill. The mill was closed in 1981, and remained derilict for many years, it was one of a number of mills located along the banks of the Tyne, all of which, due to their size, were prominent local landmarks.

After ten years in the planning and a capital investment of £50m, including £33.4m from the Arts Council Lottery Fund, BALTIC opened to the public at midnight on Saturday 13 July 2002. The Baltic, the Sage and the Millenium Bridge all opened within 2 years of each other, together they have transformed the Quayside.

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St Ann’s Battlefield

Location: City Road, NE1 2AF
Location: City Road, NE1 2AF

St Ann’s is accessible from the quiet Breamish Street, the much busier City Road and the 99 stairs from the Quayside.

St. Ann’s is a Grade 1 listed church consecrated in 1768. There has been a church on this site since medieval times. The present church was largely built with stone from the City Walls. The churchyard is among the last within the city to be closed for burials and is the resting place of many who died in the last great cholera epidemic.

St Ann’s Church served as a Quayside church. Its various savings clubs, societies, guilds and festivals supported local Battlefield families through good times and bad. Today, St Ann’s gives its name to the whole Battlefield area, now a quiet council estate built in the 1960s to replace the older terraces.

The Battlefield, like its neighbour Shieldfield, has experienced major changes in the last 50 years as riverside industries have closed and the Quayside has been regenerated as an office and leisure locality.

Nevertheless, there is still a strong sense of community and distinctiveness, as present and former residents continue to support the area through the Tenants Association on Breamish Street and the Friends of St Ann’s Church.

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The residential area adjoining the west of the lower Ouseburn now known as St Ann’s was originally known as the Battlefield. The origins of the name are unclear, as there is no record of any battle having taken place in the area.

The name might be a corruption of Bottle Field, which appears on a map in the 1870s and possibly reflects the practice of in-filling clay pits with local industrial waste. The glass bottle industry was concentrated immediately east of the Ouseburn for almost 300 years from the 1640s.

St Ann’s Church is today the major landmark of the Battlefield, standing proud above the east Quayside. Originally established as a chapel of All Saints, the church became increasingly important to the area as the eastward expansion of the Quayside brought an influx of largely unskilled and semi-skilled workers to the area.

Until the 1880s much of the Battlefield was open ground, but thereafter the area was covered with terraces of flats and houses laid out in streets named after Northumbrian rivers – Pont Street, Breamish Street, Coquet Street, Wansbeck Street, Rede Street, and Blyth Street. These flats tended to be roomier and better built than similar properties in the lower Ouseburn, and Battlefield residents had a strong sense of local identity that focused more on the Tyne riverfront than the Ouseburn or Shieldfield.

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Location St Ann’s from the Quayside

 

All Saints

All Saints

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All Saints Church was built in the years from 1786 to 1796 by the architect David Stephenson. Sir John Betjeman, the former Poet Laureate, described it as one of the finest Georgian churches in the country. It has a magnificent elliptical auditorium and splendid classical pillars. A church has stood on this site since the twelfth century, the medieval All Hallows’ Church giving way to the present church. The building was used as a place of worship until 1959.

Closed as a Church 1961 and has since undergone major restoration. Most of the time the building is shut, which is a great shame, seeing the inside is a rare treat. The old church building, now gone, was said to have been built on the site of a Roman Pantheon, and so may have older religious associations than any church in the city.

The view of All Saints towering over King Street is particularly dramatic. A view which has taken more than one visitor by surprise, including the architectural historian Ian Nairn. Take a look at Turner’s picture of Newcastle in 1823. Apart from the River Tyne, the only recognisable landmarks are All Saints and the Church of St Nicholas.

All Saints Church was built in the years from 1786 to 1796 by the architect David Stephenson. Sir John Betjeman, the former Poet Laureate, described it as one of the finest
Georgian churches in the country. It has a magnificent elliptical auditorium and splendid classical pillars. A church has stood on this site since the twelfth century, the medieval All Hallows’ Church giving way to the present church. The building was used as a place of worship until 1959.

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Closed as a Church 1961 and has since undergone major restoration. Most of the time the building is shut, which is a great shame, seeing the inside is a rare treat. The old church building, now gone, was said to have been built on the site of a Roman Pantheon, and so may have older religious associations than any church in the city.

 

Wikipedia

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All Saints View from from King Street, Newcastle Quayside

Magnet Court Gallowgate

Former General Electric Building, now student accommodation, the exterior figures bear an uncanny resemblance to modern day ‘Transformers’, they were meant to represent energy, vigour and work The same figures can be found in the control room of Battersea Power Station (A).  A great surprise then how few residents are aware of their existence as they trudge up Gallowgate, perhaps preoccupied with other things.  More information.

Magnet Court. 8 Gallowgate, NE1 4SN.
Magnet Court. 8 Gallowgate, NE1 4SN.
Magnet Court. 8 Gallowgate, NE1 4SN.
Magnet Court. 8 Gallowgate, NE1 4SN.

 

Newcastle’s Civic Centre

 

Newcastle Civic Centre is a unique modern British building, very distinct from the majority of Victorian Civic Centres in other parts of the country. It cost 4.8 million pounds to build and was designed by local architect George Kenyon. Eight years in construction, the building was designed to relate to Newcastle’s history,  it’s built like a castle, there is a garth or courtyard in the centre, it’s surrounded by big wide walls, there is a moat and a grand ceremonial entrance, the tower is lit up at the top a bit like St Nicholas Cathedral. Prominent artists and sculptures were contracted to add features to enrich the building.  Newcastle’s Civic Centre is unique, probably the most prestigious post war civic centre in England.

The Civic Centre itself was opened in 1968 by King Olav of Norway, it is still where the city council operates from.  Look out for three golden castles on top of the tower which form part of the city’s coat of arms, while the seahorses recall Newcastle’s maritime heritage.  Just before the arches leading to the entrance, you’ll notice on the wall the impressive sculpture ‘Tyne God’. Beyond it, under the arches, is an equally arresting work, ‘The Swan’. The five bronze birds represent to the five Scandinavian countries of Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Iceland.

Outside on the path towards the church are three flagpoles where there is the carved stone commemorating the visit of former US President, Jimmy Carter, who famously drawled in his southern accent to the cheering crowds, “Howay the lads”, a popular cry of the followers of Newcastle United.

Newcastle Civic Centre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Newcastle Civic Centre – Wikipedia, the free encyclopediahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newcastle_Civic_CentreNewcastle Civic Centre is a local government building located in the Haymarket area of Newcastle upon Tyne, England. It is the main administrative and ceremonial centre for…